Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV in a cohort of transgender male to female (MtF) patients from a single reference center in Paris, France

Published: August 1, 2008

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV in a cohort of transgender male to female (MtF) patients from a single reference center in Paris, France

Background: New challenges in prevention and treatment of STIs have arisen in Europe due to socio-economic and cultural factors. The University Hospital Center (UHC) Ambroise Paré, signed an agreement with the Patient French Association PASTT (Pévention Action Santé Travail Transgenre) to give health facilities and reduction of harm to this singular population. The objective is an epidemiological and clinical description of STIs and HIV among a cohort of 72 transgender Male to Female (MtF) patients followed between 1998 and 2007 in the Internal Medicine Service II of Ambroise Paré UHC.

Methods: Analysis performed with information gathered from medical observations.

Results: Population: 72 transgender patients were followed at the Center, in the mentioned period. 70 are sex workers. 65 have between 20 and 45 years. 69 are from Latin America, 61 arrived in France after 2002, 55 cannot speak French, 50 contacted the Center by the PASTT and/or HIV testing center net. For 22, it was the first contact with the health system, and for 50, the second one. 17 patients were lost of follow-up for more than 6 months.
HIV: 56 were HIV+, 17 CDC C status, 2 B status and 37 A status. 34 started antiretroviral therapy.
HCV: 1 HIV- is HCV+ .None but 1 had HCV co-infection.
HBV: 34 HIV+ presented Ac HB Core+, 2 had HBV co-infection. 7 are vaccinated. Among 16 HIV-, 5 presented Ac HB Core+ and 2 chronic HBV.
Syphilis: 33 among 56 HIV + patients and 7 among 16 HIV-. It is the most frequent infection.
Condyloma: present in 13 of 56 HIV+ and 1 of 16 HIV- patients.

Conclusions: The high prevalence of HIV+ and STIs observed and the language as a barrier to the health system incites targeted prevention measures to improve health access, diagnosis and treatment for this singular population.

-Full abstract available at link below-

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