HIV Infection Linked To Higher Risk Of Urinary Tract Symptoms In Men

Published: April 22, 2011

Participants filled in an Internet-based survey on lower urinary tract symptoms, such as intermittent urination, having a weak stream, straining, and incomplete emptying, known as voiding symptoms; as well as frequency, urgency, and the need to get up in the night to urinate, referred to as storage symptoms.

Results showed that more HIV-positive men had moderate or severe lower urinary tract symptoms (33.2 percent and 11.4 percent, respectively) compared to HIV-negative men (29.2 percent and 4.2 percent, respectively).

Further analysis showed that men with HIV were twice as likely to report severe urinary tract symptoms as men without HIV, even after accounting for other risk factors. HIV-positive men with a history of AIDS-defining illness or CD4 (white blood cell) counts less than 200 cells per microliter were 2.5 times more likely to report severe urinary tract symptoms.

Men with a history of AIDS-defining illness or low CD4 counts also had an increased risk of moderate and severe lower urinary tract symptoms than HIV-positive men with no history of AIDS-related illnesses.

HIV-positive participants were more likely to have coronary artery disease, high cholesterol or triglyceride levels, high blood pressure, and history of chlamydia, gonorrhea, urinary tract infections, and depression compared to HIV-negative men.

Risk factors for moderate urinary tract symptoms included older age, depression, diabetes, and history of urinary tract infections, prostatitis (inflammation of the prostate gland), or gonorrhea. Risk factors for severe symptoms included older age, depression, and high cholesterol or triglyceride levels.

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