HIV in the UK: 76% diagnosed, 90% on treatment, 90% undetectable

Published: November 19, 2014

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Roger Pebody
Original Article:  bit.ly/1ySiyBQ

The UK’s annual epidemiological report, released yesterday, shows that the country already provides HIV treatment to 90% of people attending clinical services and that 90% of those on treatment have an undetectable viral load. But the country has a long way to go in ensuring that people with HIV are aware of their HIV status – only 76% of people living with HIV have been diagnosed. The problem is particularly acute in black African communities, as only 62% of African heterosexual men and 69% of African heterosexual women living with HIV have been diagnosed.

Public Health England reports that 6000 people were newly diagnosed with HIV in the United Kingdom in 2013. The overall figure is lower than that seen a decade ago, due to fewer diagnoses among heterosexual men and women born in high-prevalence African countries. Among gay men, the number of diagnoses is as high as ever, with 3250 cases reported in 2013. An estimated 30% of the gay men diagnosed in 2013 were recently infected with HIV (within six months of their diagnosis).
There are now almost 110,000 people living with HIV in the country, including 26,000 who don’t know they have it. This can be broken down into risk groups:
    •    Gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (43,500 people; prevalence of 5.9%).
    •    Black African heterosexual women (25,100 people; prevalence of 7.1%).
    •    Black African heterosexual men (13,600 people; prevalence of 4.1%).
    •    Heterosexual women of other ethnicities (10,300 people; prevalence of 0.06%).
    •    Heterosexual men of other ethnicities (10,200 people; prevalence of 0.06%).
    •    People who inject drugs (2400 people; prevalence of 0.7%).

Full text of article available at link below:  bit.ly/1ySiyBQ
 

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