Detection of Oral Human Papillomavirus in HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex with Men 3 Years after Baseline: A Follow Up Cross-Sectional Study

Published: July 17, 2014

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a causative agent in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. The natural history of oral HPV in HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) is unclear.

METHODS:

Detection of oral human papillomavirus in 173 HIV-positive MSM using oral rinse samples 3 years apart was investigated. HPV DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction, and genotyped by Roche Linear Array.

RESULTS:

Of 173 men tested in 2010, 30 had at least one HPV genotype (17%, 95% CI: 12-23), 15 at least one hr-HPV (9%, 95% CI: 5-14) and 8 had HPV 16 (5%, 95% CI: 2-9) detected. In 2013, 33 had at least one HPV genotype (19%, 95% CI: 14-26), 20 had at least one hr-HPV (12%, 95% CI: 7-17) and 7 had HPV 16 (4%, 95% CI: 2-8) detected. Of 30 men at baseline (2010) with any HPV detected, 14 (47%, 95% CI: 28-66) had at least one persistent genotype. Of the 15 men in 2010 with high risk (hr-) HPV, 6 men (40%, 95% CI: 16-68) had at least one persistent hr-HPV genotype. The incidence rate of detection of at least one new HPV genotype was 4.8 per 100 person years (95% CI: 3.1-7.0), of at least one hr-HPV genotype was 3.2 per 100 person years (95% CI: 1.8-5.1) and of HPV 16 was 0.8 per 100 person years (95% CI: 0.2-2.0). The clearance rate was 14.9 per 100 person years (95% CI: 8.2-24.2) for any HPV, 18.2 per 100 person years (95% CI: 8.2-32.7) for hr-HPV and 17.4 per 100 person years (95% CI: 5.0-38.8) for HPV-16. Persistent HPV detection was associated with duration of HIV (OR 1.13 (per additional year), 95% CI: 1.00-1.26) and tonsillectomy (OR 8.17, 95% CI: 1.30-51.40).

CONCLUSION:

The same oral HPV genotype was detected again after 3 years in nearly half of HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

Full text of article available at link below – 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *