Community-based, real-time, HIV/AIDS outreach and prevention programmes for MSM in Chiang Mai Thailand based on behaviour research: producing context-specific, high impact, low cost animations as prevention resources for use online and with mobile ph

Published: July 22, 2010

Community-based, real-time, HIV/AIDS outreach and prevention programmes for MSM in Chiang Mai Thailand based on behaviour research: producing context-specific, high impact, low cost animations as prevention resources for use online and with mobile phone/MP3 players across work, social and friend networks

O.-A. Thammajinda1, N. Chaiyajit2, C. Walsh2,3, P. Lesabre1

1Payap University, McCormick Faculty of Nursing, Chiang Mai, Thailand, 2Mplus Thailand, Chiang Mai, Thailand, 3The Open University, Milton Keynes, United Kingdom

A recent demographic survey found that HIV incidence among MSM in Bangkok increased from 17% in 2003 to 31% in 2007. The rate of new HIV cases in Chiang Mai rose from 15.3% in 2005 to 16.9% in 2007, while rates in Phuket increased from 5.5% to 20%. This points to the fact that HIV prevention programmes in Thailand fail to reach MSM. Mplus, a CBO adapted its prevention strategies to the changing patterns of risk behaviour and situations involving MSM, transgenders (TG) and Thai and migrant male sex workers (MSW) and their clients and partners due to changing contexts both on and offline.
Using data generated from behaviour research of 100 local MSM, Mplus produced animations making use of context-specific narratives with the target population with whom the research was carried out. The animations were incorporated into an established HIV prevention programme via mobile phones/MP3 players and distributed to different social/sex venues. The animations were also incorporated into real-time and online peer education and popular opinion leader programmes and are available in 4 regional dialects/languages.
MSM find the animations engaging and related to their lifeworlds. They help them understand the risks associated with various sexual activities and the consequences of unsafe sex for themselves and their partners/spouses. The animations are new educational resources that help MSM understand HIV prevention, various context specific scenarios where risky behaviour may lead to HIV infection, and also increase the ability of MSM to negotiate safe sex with potential partners or clients.
This presentation will screen the animations and illustrate how organized responses to HIV/AIDS must begin at the community level and that community engagement is an essential part of prevention. Enormous opportunities exist for using mobile technologies and Web 2.0 social software to design effective and appropriate interventions for HIV/AIDS prevention.
 

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