A study of the knowledge, attitude and practice of homosexuality and associated HIV/AIDS risk

Published: August 1, 2008

A study of the knowledge, attitude and practice of homosexuality and associated HIV/AIDS risk among undergraduates of the University of Lagos, Akoka, Nigeria

Background: Amidst the rising trend of same-sex marriages in the western world and the overwhelming human rights, moral and legal issues exhumed by the recent illegalization of homosexuality by the Nigerian government, it is important that we survey the actual prevalence of homosexuality among Nigerians. Talk less of the dreaded health risk associated with the practice especially, HIV/AIDS. I conducted a cross-sectional, community-based, descriptive study among undergraduates of the University of Lagos, Akoka, Nigeria to explore their knowledge, attitude and practice of homosexuality and the associated HIV/AIDS risk. Information obtained will be useful to justify or in-validate anti-gay policies as well as in the restructuring of HIV prevention strategies to include the minority GLBT population.

Methods and results: A multistage random sampling design was used in which two faculty/college were randomly selected. A department was randomly selected from each faculty/college and two classes were randomly selected from each of the departments. Respondents were chosen using the table of random numbers.
Of the 207 respondents, 76.4% were aged 19-25 years. 82.1% knew what homosexuality is. 88.4% believed it is practiced in Nigeria. Only 18.3% knew an undergraduate who practiced homosexuality. Overwhelming 91.8% said homosexuality should never be allowed in society because, it is a sin (79.7%) and perversion of nature (72.5%). Surprisingly, 91.3% of the respondents knew that homosexuality is a risk factor for HIV infection. But, only 19.3% used a condom during sexual intercourse.
34.8% of the respondents are sexually active but only 0.5% agreed to be exclusively homosexuals and 4.8% are bisexuals.

Conclusions: Homosexual practice is an emerging reality in Nigeria. Strategies to prevent the spread of HIV infection in sub-Sahara Africa should take into consideration the contribution pulled by this sexual minority to the ravaging pandemic.

-Abstract available at link below-

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